People of the BNL

The Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNL) is dedicated to the discovery of novel approaches to the prevention and treatment of anxiety and affective disorders. Our approach is to use state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physiological basis of emotional behavior, with a focus on the role of the neurotransmitter serotonin, and to translate these findings into clinical trials. Our long-term aim is to improve the human condition.

 

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Photograph of our imaging suite,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Dady working on the Nikon 90i microscope and image capture system.

Laboratory Personnel

Principle Investigator / Lab Director:

Lowry, Christopher PhD | e-mail: christopher.lowry@colorado.edu

Christopher Lowry is the director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNL), Associate Professor of Integrative Physiology and member of the Center for Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research program focuses on the physiological mechanisms underlying emotional behavior, with a focus on the role of the neurotransmitter serotonin. A major objective of the research program is to identify novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of anxiety and affective disorders. Dr. Lowry was recently awarded a Young Investigator award from The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, and the Donald F. Klein Early Career Investigator Award from the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. Dr. Lowry is frequently invited as a speaker at international meetings, and serves as an ad-hoc reviewer for several professional journals and as a reviewer of grant applications for U.S. and overseas funding organizations.

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PhD

Donner, Nina PhD | e-mail: Nina.Donner@Colorado.EDU

Nina is a postdoctoral fellow in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at the University of Colorado Boulder. She completed her Diplom (a 5-year German BS/MS program) in zoology, genetics and microbiology at the University of Regensburg in 2005, received an MS in biomedical sciences from Colorado State University in 2008, and finished her doctorate's degree in integrative physiology at the University of Colorado Boulder in 2012. She is currently studying the effects of chronic glucocorticoid exposure on brain serotonergic systems, and also supervises a number of related projects investigating the role of serotonergic systems in control of emotional behavior. Her primary interest is to understand how different types of stressors, through actions on serotonergic systems, influence anxiety- and depressive-like behavior. Her future research will focus on discerning stress-resilient versus stress-susceptible individuals, and will aim to identify and strengthen stress-resiliency. The overall goal of her research is to provide in-depth physiological insight into natural mechanisms of stress-resiliency, leading to novel intervention, prevention, and treatment strategies for individuals at risk for or suffering from anxiety and affective disorders.

Nascimento, Glauce | e-mail: glau_nascimento@yahoo.com.br

Glauce Crivelaro Nascimento is a PhD student at the University of São Paulo – Brazil and has been a trainee in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNL) since August of 2014. She received her bachelor’s degree in Faculty of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto – University of São Paulo in 2008. Glauce’s research aims to characterize molecular events during orofacial pain as well as to study the involvement of this pain in emotional behaviors. Glauce is interested in the physiology and neuroscience of orofacial pain. In the BNL she is studying the role of serotonergic systems in temporomandibular inflammatory pain.

Scotti, Melissa-Ann PhD | e-mail: melissa.scotti@gmail.com

Melissa-Ann is an NIH postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her MA in biology from Clark University and her Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research focuses on the bidirectional relationship between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. Melissa-Ann is currently a visiting researcher in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory, where she is exploring techniques for studying the role of inflammation in the development of mood disorders. Melissa-Ann is interested in exploring the mechanisms that link inflammatory processes, CVD and depression. As such, this work will provide further insight into the treatment and prevention of these diseases.

Graduate Students

Arnold, Mathew | e-mail: mathew.arnold@colorado.edu

Mathew is a graduate student in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory. He is working on a project characterizing the molecular mechanisms controlling synaptic and extrasynaptic clearance of serotonin within the dorsal raphe nucleus, the main source of serotonergic innervation of the brain. He has a B.A. in Environmental, Population and Organismic Biology, Psychology and Integrative Physiology. Before entering graduate school Mathew worked for four years as a field researcher in Rocky Mountain National Park studying the population genetics of bighorn sheep. In his free time, Mathew is an avid ultrarunner and cyclist.

Brooks, Leah | e-mail: leahbrooks5@gmail.com

Leah is working on a project studying the developmental factors that are critical for the formation of anxiety neurocircuits. She has a B.A. in biochemistry and an M.S. in integrative physiology. Leah is a graduate student in Pei-San Tsai's lab in which she studies whether anxiety-related serotonergic neural circuits are intact and functional in mice that have reduced fibroblast growth factor signaling. She is co-mentored by Dr. Lowry in the BNL as this project integrates the expertise of both Drs. Tsai and Lowry. Prior to graduate school Leah worked in a small biotechnology company that investigated methods of sequencing DNA with a novel silicon nanopore technology and as a professional research assistant in Dr. Monika Fleshner’s lab where she investigated the effects of physical activity on the serotonergic system and stress. Leah is interested in the physiology and neuroscience of health and well-being.

Dady, Kathleen | e-mail: kathleen.dady@colorado.edu

Kathleen Dady graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder with a Master’s in Integrative Physiology in 2014 following Bachelor’s degrees in Integrative Physiology and Psychology-Neuroscience in 2011. She conducted research for 6 years in CU’s Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory investigating the relationship between serotonin, thermoregulation, and novel antidepressant treatments. As a master’s student, she taught recitations for an Endocrinology course and completed a Certificate in College Teaching through CU’s Graduate Teacher Program. She has shadowed adult and prenatal genetic counselors and developed contacts with genetic counselors working in non-traditional roles. She also volunteered as a CPR/First-Aid instructor at CU and a buddy mentor with the X and Y Chromosome Clinic at The Children’s Hospital in Denver., Currently, Kathleen is part of the Class of 2016 of the Graduate Program in Genetic Counseling, at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Center for Genetic Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. http://www.cgm.northwestern.edu/education/graduate-genetic-medicine/prospective-students/current-students.html

Dawud, Lamya’a | e-mail: lamyaa.dawud@colorado.edu

Lamya’a is currently a graduate student in the BNL. She has a B.A. in integrative physiology and a certificate in digital media from the University of Colorado Boulder and has worked in the BNL since 2010. Her research aims include neural mechanisms underlying stress-related physiology and emotional behavior with a focus on the role of serotonergic systems.

Hassell, James | e-mail: james.Hassell@Colorado.EDU

James is a PhD student who joined the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory in the fall of 2013. He is investigating the potential role of a novel serotonin transporter, organic cation transporter 3, in control of emotional behavior. He received his Master’s in biology at the University of South Dakota with Dr. Kenneth Renner studying the role of organic cation transporter 3 in control of local serotonin concentrations in the amygdala. He receieved his Bachelor’s in biology at Texas Woman’s University where he studied under Dr. Lynda Uphouse and investigated hormone and stress effects on female sexual behavior.

Hibl, Peter | e-mail: peter.hibl@colorado.edu

Peter is a native Coloradan who began working in the BNL in 2008 as an undergraduate student in the Department of Integrative Physiology. After receiving his B.A. in integrative physiology with a certificate in neuroscience from CU-Boulder in 2009, Peter took time off from school to become an EMT and explore the world of working odd jobs such as mobile event catering and running his own small construction business. Peter resumed working in the BNL in 2011 as a Professional Research Assistant, and transitioned into the Master’s program in fall 2012. Peter’s research projects are diverse, including studying the role of serotonin in the etiology of bipolar depression, and using viral vectors to investigate neural mechanisms underlying fear. Peter loves the opportunities available in the Master’s program, especially working as a TA for human anatomy lab, an experience that has led him to pursue a certificate in college teaching. When not in the lab you can find Peter on the mountain bike trails around Boulder or freeing a heel in the backcountry.

Lowe, Kenneth | e-mail: kenneth.lowe@colorado.edu

Kenneth is a combined bachelors/master’s student in Integrative Physiology, currently in his fourth year of education. Currently Kenneth is working with Dr. Donner on a project concerning the effects of immunization with commensal mycobacterium on gene expression in serotonergic systems. Kenneth’s work hopes to elucidate a neuronal basis for the immunization’s apparent increase in resilience to chronic psychosocial stress. He is also interested in studying the topic of vaccination against affective disorders such as anxiety and depression; as well as the neural mechanisms underlying affective disorders in general. Following graduate school Kenneth hopes to pursue a career in the medical field

Paul, Evan | e-mail: evan.paul@colorado.edu

Evan Paul has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Colorado Boulder and is currently a doctoral candidate in the BNL. His research focuses on the interaction between neuropeptides and serotonergic systems and how they coordinate physiological and behavioral responses to stress. Prior to graduate school, Evan worked in Dr. Steven Maier's Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory where he conducted research on how behavioral control blocks the maladaptive consequences of stress. The underlying goal of his research is to delineate the neural pathways involved in stress responses in order to develop novel therapeutics to treat stress-related diseases.

Siebler, Philip | e-mail: philip.siebler@colorado.edu

Philip Siebler is a PhD student and has been working in the BNL since 2009. He received his bachelor’s degree in integrative physiology and molecular, cellular, and developmental biology from CU-Boulder in 2010. Philip’s research aims to characterize the effects of peripheral immune activation on serotonergic systems, stress-related physiology, and emotional behavior, with broader implications for public health. His current projects examine the stress-protective physiological and behavioral effects of preimmunization with a heat-killed preparation of the non-pathogenic environmental bacterium, Mycobacterium vaccae, in rodent animal models.

Smith, David | e-mail: qu4drupole@gmail.com

David is a PhD student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at CU-Boulder and is conducting his graduate research in the BNL. David is working on the discovery and characterization of novel immunosuppressive molecules derived from mycobacteria. He received his B.S. in biochemistry from The Ohio State University. While at OSU and after his graduation, he worked as a research technician in a biophysics lab studying the structure and dynamics of RNase P protein subunits. He has a broad, deep interest in most biological sciences, including molecular biology, immunology, bioinformatics, and biochemistry

Stamper, Christopher | e-mail: christopher.stamper@colorado.edu

Christopher is studying the role of serotonergic systems in physiology and behavior relevant to anxiety and affective disorders. Specific projects address mechanisms underlying fast feedback inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress hormone axis, as well as brain pathways underlying fear. He has a B.A. in Integrative Physiology and worked as a professional research assistant before starting his graduate studies. Christopher is a graduate student in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory. Christopher is interested in the physiology and neuroscience of well-being, stress, and stress hormones. In his free time he enjoys being in the outdoors skiing, mountain biking, rock climbing, hiking, camping, and being wild.

Research Assistants

Heinze, Jared | e-mail: jared.heinze@colorado.edu

Jared is a research assistant in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at University of Colorado since May 2012. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Integrative Physiology at CU Boulder in May 2012. Jared’s research focuses on understanding neuronal circuitry associated with anxiety and stress coping mechanisms and how these circuits are correlated with changes in serotonergic activity. He plans on eventually returning to school for a Master’s degree in a Physician Assistant (PA) program.

Werner, Zach | e-mail: zachary.werner@colorado.edu

Zach graduated in Fall of 2013 with his bachelors in integrative physiology from CU-Boulder. As an individual passionate about physiology and as a former student in Dr. Lowry’s Endocrinology course, he works closely with the lab director with revamping/maintaining the BNL website to closely match his vision for the lab. Tentatively, Zach plans on attending graduate, PA, or medical school, but currently holds a position as a PRA at the Institute for Behavioral Genetics. He looks forward to working with the rest of the BNL (in a more official capacity) sometime in the near future.

Volunteers

Gazi, Suhail | e-mail: suhailhyder@hotmail.co.uk

Suhail Gazi is a volunteer in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory since fall 2013. He completed his MS in Molecular Neuroscience at University of Bristol, UK. He is working with David Smith to conduct cell-based assays designed to identify novel small molecule anti-inflammatory compounds.

Russell, David | e-mail: David.S.Russell@Colorado.EDU

David is a volunteer in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory since April 2013. He received his Bachelor's degree in integrative physiology with a certificate in neuroscience from CU-Boulder in 2012. He is conducting radioligand binding studies to characterize the pharmacological profile of novel antidepressant drugs. He plans to attend medical school after gaining more lab experience.

Undergraduates

Brazell, Chrisopher | e-mail: Christopher.Brazell@Colorado.EDU

Chris is a fourth year undergraduate studying integrative physiology. He has been a member of the BNL since the summer of 2012 assisting Kathleen Dady. His project aims to characterize the neurophysiological effects of novel antidepressant drugs. He has received a Bioscience Undergraduate Research Skills and Training (BURST) fellowship, funded by the Biological Sciences Initiative (BSI), 12-13 AY, and two Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) grants; individual grant (summer 13), and Howard Hughes Medical Institute award (13-14 AY). Chris is planning on continuing his research through the fall of 2014 at which time after graduating he plans to apply for medical school.

Ferrell, Warren | e-mail: Warren.Ferrell@Colorado.EDU

Warren is a second year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder triple majoring in biochemistry, environmental biology, and cellular biology with a possible minor in computer science. He started work in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory under the guidance of graduate student David Smith in spring 2014. The two are working with tumor cell models of enterochromaffin cells (serotonergic cells lining the digestive tract that play a role in gut motility). Warren is interested in pursuing a graduate school education with a focus on gut microbiome metabolism. He plans on graduating from his undergraduate program with honors in spring 2016.

Fields, Brandon | e-mail: Brandon.K.Fields@Colorado.EDU

Brandon is a fifth year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in integrative physiology and classical guitar performance. He has been working in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory since August, 2011 assisting Evan Paul in his research on stress and behavioral coping strategies. Brandon has presented his work in poster presentations at venues such as the annual meetings for the Society for Neuroscience, and the Front Range Neuroscience Group. Brandon is currently preparing his honors thesis on the effects of microRNA regulation of adrenergic receptors in the amygdala on noradrenergic transmission and fear circuitry, for defense in Spring, 2014.

Gracie, Thomas | e-mail: Thomas.Gracie@Colorado.EDU

Bio unavailable.

Helmerick, Kathryn | e-mail:

Kathryn was an undergraduate research assistant in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory from the fall of 2009 through the Spring of 2011. Her work focused on the role of serotonergic systems in the regulation of behavior. She graduated with a BA in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and matriculated to Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. She will graduate with a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine in the spring of 2015. She has special interests in small animal clinical neurology and owes her success and focus thus far to the mentorship and experiences gained in the Behavioral and Neuroendocrinology Laboratory.

Kapitz, Adam "AJ" | e-mail: adam.Kapitz@Colorado.EDU

AJ is a fourth year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in integrative physiology. He has been working in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory since the spring term of 2013 assisting graduate student Christopher Stamper in his research regarding neural mechanisms underlying fear. AJ’s work has been supported by the Bioscience Undergraduate Research Skills and Training (BURST) fellowship (13-14 AY), which is funded by the Biological Sciences Initiative (BSI) through a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). AJ plans on continuing his work in Dr. Lowry’s lab into 2014 assisting Christopher Stamper and PhD student James Hassel with their ongoing and future experiments. After graduation AJ plans on taking some time off to explore the health care field with the goal of entering a graduate program in medicine, physical therapy, or research. --

Lamb, Andrew | e-mail: Andrew.Lamb@Colorado.EDU

Andrew is a senior undergraduate majoring in integrative physiology. He has been working in the lab since the Fall of 2012, assisting Jamie Fox with his work investigating neural systems underlying control of serotonergic systems and fear. Andrew has gained much research experience over his time in the lab that will be invaluable upon his graduation.

Lopez-Perez, Gerardo | e-mail: Gerardo.LopezPerez@Colorado.EDU

Gerardo is a second year student at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in integrative physiology. He has been working in the BNL since the fall of 2012 under the supervision of graduate student Philip Siebler. His project involves analyzing the effects of a heat-killed preparation of the pseudocommensal bacterium, M. vaccae, on stress-induced activation of microglial cells. Gerardo’s work has been funded by a couple of individual fellowship grants including the Bioscience Undergraduate Research Skills and Training (BURST) fellowship (Fall ‘12) and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Individual grant (Summer ‘13). He was recently awarded the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) for the upcoming Summer of 2014. Gerardo is passionate about science and education and intends to pursue a career in the medical/science field

Malzbender, Joseph | e-mail: Joseph.Malzbender@Colorado.EDU

Joey is a second year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. He joined the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory in the fall semester of 2012 assisting Jared Kopelman and Nina Donner in their studies of the effects of nicotine on serotonergic gene expression, specifically expression of slc6a4, which encodes the serotonin transporter. He has been funded by both an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Research Assistantship in Spring, 13, as well as a UROP Individual Grant during the 13-14 AY. He plans on staying with the lab for the duration of the project, and is expected to graduate in spring 2016. He plans on either pursuing graduate school or attending medical school following graduation.

McArthur, Jessica | e-mail: jessica.mcarthur@Colorado.EDU

Jessi is a third year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in integrative physiology with a minor in leadership. She began working in the BNL assisting graduate student Mathew Arnold during the summer of 2012. Jessi has worked under several grants including an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Assistantship and two Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Individual Grants (12-13 AY; Summer 13; 13-14 AY). Jessi attended Front Range Neuroscience Group 2013, presenting a poster on the effects of repeated voluntary or forced exercise on thermosensitive serotonergic systems. Her plans include continuing research in the BNL until her undergraduate graduation with hopes to attend medical school in 2016.

Novik, Kirill | e-mail: Novik@Colorado.EDU

Kirill is a research assistant in the BNL since January 2014. He assists David Smith in his research on the comparative genomics and proteomics of bacteria, with a focus on Mycobacterium vaccae and closely related mycobacteria. He also volunteers in the Maier/Watkins laboratory, focusing on an ALS project. He is a fourth year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in molecular biology and minoring in computer science. He plans to attend graduate school in bioinformatics after receiving his bachelor's degree. His research has been supported by a UROP Assistantship. He plans to explore the modern techniques and methods in computational biology.

Waters, Ryan | e-mail: ryan.waters@colorado.edu

Ryan is a second year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder majoring in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. He has worked in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory since the fall of 2012 assisting Jared Kopelman and Nina Donner in their studies of the effects of nicotine on serotonergic gene expression, specifically expression of tph2, which encodes the tryptophan hydroxyls, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin. Ryan’s work has been supported by an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Research Assistantship in Spring, 13, as well as a UROP Individual Grant during the 13-14 AY. Ryan intends to continue working in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory while pursuing his bachelor’s degree. Upon graduating, Ryan plans to attend graduate school to study genetics.

Williams, Piper | e-mail: Piper.Williams@Colorado.EDU

Piper is a third-year undergraduate at the University of Colorado Boulder studying integrative physiology. She has been working in the BNL since the spring term of 2013 assisting Mathew Arnold in his research on the characterization of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) function. Piper’s research has been supported by several individual fellowships including the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Research Assistantship (spring 2013) and a series of UROP Individual Grants (summer 2013, 2013-2014 AY). Piper will be continuing her work with the BNL during the 2013-2014 AY, summer 2014, and 2014-2015 AY.

Alumni

Alsofrom, Nicholas | e-mail:

Nick worked in the BNL for 2 years, from the summer of 2010 to 2012, and focused on understanding the role of serotonergic systems in relaying signals of peripheral inflammation within the brain. Nick is starting medical school in August, 2015 at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). He hopes to specialize in trauma surgery.

Fields, Brandon | e-mail: Brandon.K.Fields@Colorado.EDU

Over the last three years, I have had the good fortune of working closely with both Dr. Christopher Lowry, as well as with my then-graduate student mentor, Dr. Evan Paul, as an undergraduate research assistant in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory. Dr. Lowry’s dedication to teaching is unparalleled, and his renowned reputation offered me the opportunity to collaborate with scientific researchers throughout the world. The technical training I have received in areas such as the procedures and methods involved in the quantification of neurochemical changes in the brain has thoroughly prepared me to pursue advanced study in the field of behavioral neuroscience, and the nurturing environment fostered by Dr. Lowry and his staff has encouraged my continued interest and enthusiasm in the biological sciences. Furthermore, the critical thinking and writing skills that I gained through the close mentorship of both of my supervisors in the preparation of seven undergraduate grants throughout my career was invaluable in preparing me to write an original manuscript for my undergraduate honors thesis.

Lupa, Jakob | e-mail:

Jakob worked in the Lowry Lab during the summers of 2009, 2010, and 2011. He worked with Dr. Jodi Lukkes on a project to better clarify the distribution of CRF receptors in the rat brain using a fluorescent CRF conjugate compound (CRF-TAMRA). He later moved to Seattle, WA to earn a B.S. in neurobiology with a minor degree in Swedish at the University of Washington. He is now attending Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, IL. Jakob plans to continue studying the field of neuroscience in the future, perhaps by specializing in a related field of medicine.

Mani, Sophia | e-mail:

Sofia graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2013 with her BA and MS in Integrative Physiology with financial support for her research from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, and Biological Sciences Initiative. She studied under the guidance and mentorship of Dr. Lowry within the academic setting as a student as well as a research setting as an assistant. Sofia’s main emphasis in lab focused on interactions between the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the dorsal raphe nucleus within the context of serotonin-related gene expression. This project, among several others, introduced her to the underlying fundamentals of research-based clinical theory in medicine from several avenues. “My experiences in Dr. Lowry’s Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Lab established a solid understanding and appreciation for physiology and development of clinical medicine with relation to lab work across the nation. I also presented at the international Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting twice (among other conferences) which was an amazing learning and networking experience. I went into medical school with a solid appreciation for research and I will continue to attend conferences in the clinical setting even as a first year. I know through my experience in Dr. Lowry's lab that research truly plays an integral role in medicine.” Sofia is currently attending medical school at AT Still University in Arizona and will graduate as a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine in 2018.

Nguyen, Thanh | e-mail:

After graduation Thanh worked at a behavior health clinic for a few years and she is currently on a leave of absence from medical school. According to Thanh, “My experience at the lab has helped me in many ways and I can't say enough about the growth opportunity I received. My project while at the lab inspired me to consider graduate school and really imbued in me an appreciation for science and exploration.”

Quach, Anthony | e-mail:

Anthony graduated in the spring of 2014 and is now a chemical engineer at Bend Research Inc in Bend, Oregon. He is working in the biotherapeutics division of Dosage Form Solutions, a group that works on early stage process development for the production of protein therapeutics. His work centers around modelling cell behavior and responses and using that as a predictive tool to forecast several variables in target-protein expressing cell cultures. He feels that his experience with the Lowry group has given him a valuable skill set in the biopharmaceutical industry.

Strickland, Tamara | e-mail:

Tamara worked with the BNL from spring, 2009 until summer, 2010. Tamara’s work was supported by a number of individual fellowships including a UROP Assistantship (Spring ’09), and a BURST Fellowship (2009-2010 AY). After graduation in August 2010 Tamara received a Master’s of Science in Accountancy from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and is now working as an auditor at KPMG, a large CPA firm. Tamara just completed her CPA exam in October and hopes to be fully licensed next August.

Wilkinson, Andra | e-mail:

I had the wonderful opportunity to work with Dr. Lowry and his postdoctoral student at the time, Dr. Hale on the connections between bronchopulmonary infection and serotonergic neurons in the brainstem during my senior undergraduate year at CU. I am still so grateful for the careful mentorship and diverse learning opportunities they provided. Following graduation I worked in public health at Kaiser Permanente for nearly three years and am currently a PhD student in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a trainee at the Carolina Population Center, my research is focused on the connection between substance use, the physiological stress response, and depression. I was recently awarded an F31 training grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to continue this work for my dissertation.

Wilkinson, Andrea | e-mail:

I had the wonderful opportunity to work with Dr. Lowry and his postdoctoral student at the time, Dr. Hale on the connections between bronchopulmonary infection and serotonergic neurons in the brainstem during my senior undergraduate year at CU. I am still so grateful for the careful mentorship and diverse learning opportunities they provided. Following graduation I worked in public health at Kaiser Permanente for nearly three years and am currently a PhD student in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a trainee at the Carolina Population Center, my research is focused on the connection between substance use, the physiological stress response, and depression. I was recently awarded an F31 training grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to continue this work for my dissertation.

Zuniga, Alfredo | e-mail: Alfredo.Zuniga@Colorado.EDU

PhD candidate, Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), Portland, Oregon, USA.

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